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As happy as a coyote in a corn pile

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Nov. 6th, 2010 | 12:35 pm
mood: hungryhungry

I think I've found another expression I should try and add to my vocabulary — "happier than a coyote in a corn pile". :) (Hat tip to Shreve Stockton of dailycoyote fame for this one, BTW.)

I'm not sure I'll use it much, just like I'm (unfortunately) not using "a few fries short of a Happy Meal" much (or "a few wolves short of a pack", for that matter), but it's one that's worth remembering no matter what. :)

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Comments {8}

wonka4500

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from: wonka4500
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 12:40 am (UTC)
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I love the daily coyote :) I go every day to check out Charlie's antics :)

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 10:04 am (UTC)
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Hehe, yeah, same for me — it's a lovely site, isn't it? :)

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moonhare

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from: bunny_plush
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 12:48 am (UTC)
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I like that- pure joy :o)

A couple of favorites I use are "lights on, no one's home," and "squirrels in the attic." *snicker* I guess I deal with a lot of vacant-minded sorts.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 10:11 am (UTC)
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"squirrels in the attic"? What does that mean? :)

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moonhare

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from: bunny_plush
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 12:00 pm (UTC)
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I use "Squirrels in the attic" similarly to "Bats in the belfry," but more along the line of scatterbrained, loopy, or even hare-brained. Like calling someone "Squirrely." The expression is best said with a slight eye-roll accompanied by a nod of the head and a tap on the temple with one's index finger ;o)

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 12:59 pm (UTC)
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accompanied by a nod of the head and a tap on the temple with one's index finger ;o)

Ah, that's interesting — I just browsed through a book a few weeks ago at a local bookstore (the "foot-in-your-mouth guide to the USA") that claimed that this gesture was unknown over there. I remember that particular factoid because I was rather surprised by it, and apparently, it wasn't even true after all. (Which only reinforces the less-than-stellar expression I got of the book.)

Edited at 2010-11-07 12:59 pm (UTC)

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moonhare

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from: bunny_plush
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 01:43 pm (UTC)
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That is interesting. I've seen the gesture in countless movies and cartoons over the years, and just adopted it as easily as my regional accent.

On the topic of gestures, I only realized a couple of years ago that the one made by St. Nicholas in Clement Moore's A Visit From St. Nicholas, the "laying his finger beside his nose" one, wasn't some magical way of traveling up chimneys as much as it was the equivalent of a sly wink, or "Let's keep this between us:" Stumm! says the author in this book.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Nov. 7th, 2010 01:53 pm (UTC)
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Mmm, interesting! (I likely would not have recognized that gesture, either; putting your finger on your lips (like this), yes, but beside your nose?)

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