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Blessed solstice

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Dec. 22nd, 2014 | 12:03 am

It seemed appropriate for this moment... Luna Raising the Moon by Deftspex:


Image: Deftspex @ DA

Blessed winter solstice, everyone!

Those on the southern hemisphere may enjoy Celestia raising the Sun instead.

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Comments {38}

moonhare

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from: mondhasen
date: Dec. 21st, 2014 11:06 pm (UTC)
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Same to you! Enjoy the extra darkness...

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 21st, 2014 11:08 pm (UTC)
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Thanks! I would if it wasn't raining as heavily as it unfortunately is right now.

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 21st, 2014 11:14 pm (UTC)
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Very nice! No rain here, just heavy frost that turned all the trees white. ^_^

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 21st, 2014 11:37 pm (UTC)
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Ah, frost... I vaguely recall that. It's something that used to happen in winter, right? :P

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 22nd, 2014 01:16 pm (UTC)
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More like mid-autumn. Frost on leaves, frost on flowers, frost on rose-hips... ^_^

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 22nd, 2014 05:35 pm (UTC)
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Mmm, I sure wish I lived in a place where you'd get frost and snow in mid-autumn.

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 24th, 2014 12:44 am (UTC)
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Come on over to my place! It's cluttered and mice keep letting themselves in, but we can go cut down a few birches and fire up the wood stove! ^_^

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 24th, 2014 10:32 am (UTC)
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Sounds great! That's up in Canada, right?

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ungulata

(no subject)

from: ungulata
date: Dec. 24th, 2014 12:40 pm (UTC)
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Yep, French Canada even! Wide open spaces and poutine you can eat!

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 25th, 2014 11:15 am (UTC)
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Oh, you said the P-word! heathersmoo's gonna love you. :)

(Myself, I never actually tried the stuff, though it does sound interesting.)

Edited at 2014-12-25 11:15 am (UTC)

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 25th, 2014 12:03 pm (UTC)
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It tastes like its description, gravy and chunks of mild hard cheese on french fries ("chips", patates frites). ^_^ Served hot.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 25th, 2014 12:22 pm (UTC)
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Served hot.

I'm slightly alarmed that this warrants mentioning — would I otherwise have to expect fries to be served cold in Canada? :P

Edited at 2014-12-25 12:22 pm (UTC)

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ungulata

Some like it hot, some like it cold, some like it in the pot nine days old

from: ungulata
date: Dec. 25th, 2014 06:22 pm (UTC)
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It cools rapidly, so if you have a mind to finish yours later or finish off someone else's plate, you'll have to tolerate cold gravy and soggy french fries. Hot food is usually a temporary state. ^_^

Cold french fries are not too pleasant and do not rewarm at all well, so yes, "served hot", and fresh, is important.

Edited at 2014-12-25 06:27 pm (UTC)

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Schneelocke

Re: Some like it hot, some like it cold, some like it in the pot nine days old

from: schnee
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:20 pm (UTC)
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Touché — and I agree, cold fries are less than appetizing (certainly less so than hot ones).

Poutine's definitely on the list-of-things-to-try-when-I-make-it-to-Canada. (Speaking of which... what other Canadian, or indeed Québécois, foods and specialties would you recommend?)

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ungulata

Re: Some like it hot, some like it cold, some like it in the pot nine days old

from: ungulata
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 01:26 pm (UTC)
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Recommend... sounds a bit like I'm giving poutine high praise! X^D Well the only other meal that is generally local is the sugaring off meal, served in late winter when the sap is flowing in the sugar maples. It's more like breakfast with maple syrup on everything, except the Oreilles de Crisse (jaw breaking deep dried pork rinds). There's tarte au sucre (pie) and crème à sucre (soft cubes of buttery sugar). Ah, and another thing -- raclette. It's like a fondue in that you cook your own meat on a small hot plate in the middle of the table, put it on bread with some cheese, melt it together and then eat that while you cook your next mouthful. Apart from that, there's tourtière, a meat pie. The name comes from tourte, the passenger pigeon, which went extinct a while back. I guess the early colonists ate a lot of wild pigeon. Finally, there's the Buche de Noël, the Christmas Log, a cake shaped like a log with the cake and frosting rolled into a spiral on the inside, and more frosting on top.

There's also beer, cider and now, ice wine. And apples.

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 05:55 pm (UTC)
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OMG poutine!!!!!

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:20 pm (UTC)
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I knew you'd love it. :)

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:27 pm (UTC)
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I actually just had a convo with a South African, trying to explain what poutine was, but then someone from Ottawa jumped in and said it was like wallpaper paste so I had to hurry and defend the honor of poutine.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:32 pm (UTC)
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Heh, that's hardly the most flattering comparison imaginable. I hope you convinced that South-African guy that poutine's better than that — and the Ottawan, too!

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:41 pm (UTC)
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I did my best with Mr. South Africa. Mr. Ottawa is a lost cause in that respect though. He thinks that anything having to do with French Canada is bad.

Being an American, particularly one who is about as far from the border states as you can get, I really haven't been exposed to any prejudice one way or another so I have no reason to like or dislike poutine on anything but its own merit.

Everyone here worries instead about Cuba, Haiti, and to a lesser extent, Mexico and Canada is just too far away to worry about. There are a lot of Canadian expats here but they almost never talk about Canada unless you ask them directly. Again, if I had to guess I'd say they don't know that border state prejudice doesn't reach this far south at all.

I can honestly say I never thought much of Canada one way or the other until I visited it and discovered its many wonders, of which, poutine is far and away the most wonderous.

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Schneelocke

(no subject)

from: schnee
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:43 pm (UTC)
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Now I'm curious, what are the others?

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:48 pm (UTC)
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Well, Kinder eggs are a big draw even though they aren't at all Canadian. Same with the metric system. It's also fun to have exposure to non-creole French rather than Spanish. Newfoundland in particular has a beauty unlike anything I've ever seen before. I've seen lots of little things like it in other places but the landscape mixes a lot of cool stuff together in a very intriguing way. When I try to enumerate, it just ends up with a short lame sounding list but there is something about Canada that is just really cool and different from anywhere else.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:54 pm (UTC)
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Oh yeah, I can see what you mean. It's certainly quite different from the USA.

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:58 pm (UTC)
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Yeah, with our largely shared history, it is a really compelling combination of being just like the States and also wildly dissimilar.

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 26th, 2014 10:25 pm (UTC)
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I want to invite myself over for poutine now too, don't mind me... I just wish I could get it here :/

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 01:34 pm (UTC)
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Come on down! We even have a greasy spoon that made its fortune selling "the best poutine". It's called Chez Ben On Se Bourre la Bedaine (at Ben's we stuff our guts).

All you really need are french fries, squeaky cheese curds and thin gravy. Combine the hot fries with the cheese curds in a bowl, pour the hot gravy on top et voilà, poutine.

Edited at 2014-12-27 01:46 pm (UTC)

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 04:29 pm (UTC)
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I'd love to. It sounds amazing. What part of Quebec are you in?

I've tried so many times to make poutine but without the right cheese (which is yet another thing that is illegal to import here) the whole thing just falls apart. It is amazing how there are so few ingredients so you'd think poutine would be easy to make but I guess with a few, each counts a lot more and it has to be flawless.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 05:03 pm (UTC)
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the right cheese (which is yet another thing that is illegal to import here)

I'm intrigued — what cheese is that that's illegal to import into the USA?

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 05:20 pm (UTC)
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It's a pasteurization issue, not any particular type of cheese, or so I've been told.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 05:21 pm (UTC)
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Ah, OK. What kind of cheese is it that you need for poutine?

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 05:22 pm (UTC)
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I'm not sure what type of cheese curds it is. I know it when I taste it but it is most similar to what you find in Wisconsin.

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 12:41 pm (UTC)
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Ah, haven't been to Wisconsin — it's one of the states I've yet to reach.

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 12:46 pm (UTC)
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I haven't spent much time there myself but my parents used to live in Milwaukee before I was born and they said it was the coldest place ever and from their descriptions it sounds like Narnia in that it was "always winter and never Christmas."

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Schneelocke

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from: schnee
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 01:20 pm (UTC)
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Heh. That doesn't sound so bad to me, really.

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 27th, 2014 08:38 pm (UTC)
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Southern Quebec, Eastern Townships.

I'd have thought mozzarella would work.

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 12:13 pm (UTC)
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You would think so but when I've tried it, it tastes completely off and not nearly as flavorful as what I've had in the Great White North.

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ungulata

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from: ungulata
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 12:59 pm (UTC)
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Squeaky cheese is really salty. Try soaking cubes of mozzarella or cheddar overnight in a salt brine, drain, press the cheese and try again?

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The Goddess of Smoo

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from: heathersmoo
date: Dec. 28th, 2014 01:00 pm (UTC)
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Oh wow, that's a good idea! I'll let you know how it goes...

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